Poker Pro's Corner: Poker camp will make you a better live player
Jan 04,2008 00:00 by Shawn Rice

Q: I am an online player wanting to transition into live play. I am worried about my tells. How can I prepare to play live without risking money?

 
SHAWN RICE - UltimateBet Internet pro Shawn Rice spends his time traveling for tournaments and playing online. Rice has won thousands online and continues to impress live with cashes totaling more than $330,000. CNS Photo. 
- Twitching in Tennessee

A: Joe Navarro is an FBI profiler and if you are really serious about your poker game, you have to go to one of these boot camps where he will be featured. I don't care if you are a top pro or you are an amateur, if you are serious about your game, you have to go to the Joe Navarro camp. He does a lot of the Annie Duke camps, and he has done the World Series of Poker camps. He teaches about mannerisms and human nature and about how people react to different things and how you can adapt it all to your poker world. The training is all about tells, facial expressions, posture and how the FBI has learned to read these tells during an interrogation. You need them in poker. There isn't a tournament I play in where it doesn't come up at least once or twice.

Q: I was playing heads-up the other night and got asked to chop. I had 400,000 chips and my opponent had 300,000 with 10,000-20,000 blinds. I wasn't sure what to do. How can you trust that the person will give you money online and is it worth it to make those kind of deals?

- Sucker Free, Macon, Ga.

A: You can't trust the person; you don't know that you are going to get your money online unless it is a facilitated chop by the site itself. What I would probably do is just play it out and I wouldn't take the worst of it. If the site can facilitate the chop based on chip count and you like that idea, you can do it. If you think you are the better player, never chop. If you think that you are the worst player and you are getting a good deal, chop. Do what is in your own best interest.

Q: What is a common mistake that you see people making online?

- Mad Mary, Waupun, Wis.

A: A common mistake I see a lot is people min-raising (raising the minimum amount). You find out no information when they call such a small raise. You have no idea where you are at. Stay away from the minimum bet. Also, either overplaying a hand or underplaying a hand is common. There are so many weaknesses, but probably one of the most common ones I see is playing bad hands in bad position. People are raising in early position with A-J or A-10, knowing the best hand they can beat, if they have A-J for example, is A-10. No one is going to call that bet with A-10 or worse, so they are putting themselves in a bad situation playing for a bigger pot with a bad hand.

UltimateBet Internet pro Shawn Rice spends his time traveling for tournaments and playing online. Rice has cashed in online for thousands of dollars and continues to impress live with cashes totaling more than $330,000.